Items filtered by date: October 2013
Friday, 04 October 2013 12:54

Icona Pop CDs

‘This Is... Icona Pop’ is the debut album from Swedish pop sensations Icona Pop.

It features the duo’s current single, ‘Girlfriend’, and hit single, ‘I Love It’ featuring Charli XCX.

Peaking at #2 on the ARIA single chart and #1 on the Australian Dance Chart, ‘I Love It’ dominated our summer playlists.

“It's going to be really honest, it's kind of a diary for us. We've experienced a lot of lovely and weird stuff this year!” Caroline Hjelt says.

"It's just a lot of love, a lot of friends,” Aino Jawo adds humbly.

To win one of three copies of the album This competition has closed.
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Terms and Conditions:

1. Winners will be drawn at random at 4pm Thursday 10th October at Level 2, 192-210 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley. [Winners drawn]
2. Winners will be notified by e-mail. [Winners notified]
3. Winners must arrange to collect the prize from Scene Magazine's offices at Level 2, 192-210 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley, during business hours.
4. Entrants' email address will not be used for any other purpose except the conduct of this competition.

Published in Competition
Wednesday, 02 October 2013 18:34

Alan Partridge Alpha Papa Preview Passes

'Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa' is the latest film from English comic genius Steve Coogan.

When famous DJ Alan Partridge's radio station is taken over by a new media conglomerate, it sets in motion a chain of events which see Alan having to work with the police to defuse a potentially violent siege.

To win one of ten double passes to an exclusive preview screening at Dendy Portside, Monday October 21 This competition has closed.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Terms and Conditions:

1. Winners will be drawn at random at 12.30pm Wednesday 9th October at Level 2, 192-210 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley. [Winners drawn]
2. Winners will be notified by e-mail. [Winners notified]
3. Winners must arrange to collect the prize from Scene Magazine's offices at Level 2, 192-210 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley, during business hours.
4. Entrants' email address will not be used for any other purpose except the conduct of this competition.

Published in Competition
Wednesday, 02 October 2013 18:16

Bullhorn Tickets

Brisbane's own dynamic nu-wave brass band, Bullhorn, are their launching their new single next week.

Bullhorn are an acoustic force of nature with a line-up including seven hard hitting horn players, one bossing drummer and one monster MC.

The new single includes two Bullhorn originals; ‘Roll Off The Top’, a catchy hard hitting hip hop tune featuring Roman MC and Laneous, as well as ‘Beach Party’, an upbeat good times instrumental old school soul tune.

To win one of two double passes to Bullhorn show at The Zoo Friday October 11 This competition has closed.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Terms and Conditions:

1. Winners will be drawn at random at 5pm Tuesday 8th October at Level 2, 192-210 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley. [Winners drawn]
2. Winners will be notified by e-mail. [Winners notified]
3. Winners must arrange to collect the prize from Scene Magazine's offices at Level 2, 192-210 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley, during business hours.
4. Entrants' email address will not be used for any other purpose except the conduct of this competition.

Published in Competition
Wednesday, 02 October 2013 18:03

Busby Marou CDs

Mandolins, ukulele and whistles – stories of travels across the globe, and the pull of home.

Like catching up with old friends you’ve been hanging out to hear from, ‘Farewell Fitzroy’ is Busby Marou’s welcome return, the highly anticipated second album from the Queensland duo.

Two years on from their acclaimed self-titled debut, ‘Farewell Fitzroy’ is 12 tracks of folk-pop and country-tinged song craft, distinctly Australian storytelling, and the gifted musicianship of Tom Busby and Jeremy Marou.

To win one of three copies of ‘Farewell Fitzroy’ This competition has closed.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Terms and Conditions:

1. Winners will be drawn at random at 4pm Tuesday 8th October at Level 2, 192-210 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley. [Winners drawn]
2. Winners will be notified by e-mail. [Winners notified]
3. Winners must arrange to collect the prize from Scene Magazine's offices at Level 2, 192-210 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley, during business hours.
4. Entrants' email address will not be used for any other purpose except the conduct of this competition.

Published in Competition

The new theatre rendition of John Birmingham's 1994 novel, ‘He Died With A Felafel In His Hand’, will be returning for a run of six shows at The Brisbane Powerhouse.

Join in on the story and follow the journey of shifting milk crates from one dysfunctional sharehouse to the next and encountering freaks, geeks, gamers, players, stoners, junkies, flunkies, losers, bruisers, strippers, whippers and moontanners.

It’s a Brisbane story, by a Brisbane author, with a Brisbane cast in one of Brisbane’s best theatre space.

“The Powerhouse is a beautiful venue, well regarded for its dynamic and innovative programming,” says director Natalie Bochenski. “It's only appropriate that we hijack its reputation for a week with a dose of explicit content, swearing, toilet humour and the odd flash of nudity.”

Shaun King, who plays the male lead in the play, is in total agreement and is a big fan of Natalie's work.

“Natalie's rendition of the play is inspired. She's done a really fantastic job and we can't wait to perform,” he explains.

Shaun will be playing the protagonist character, JB, in a cast of eleven and he said channelling the character was very easy.

“The character of JB is just an amplified version of myself. I really didn't have to do much to get into the character. He's a really great character to play. The cast have done an amazing job. John Birmingham wrote the book with brilliant clarity and structure so it transitions to theatre really well. 'He Died With A Felafel In His Hand' has been rendered and performed countless times, but this version is probably the best we've ever done.”

‘He Died With A Felafel In His Hand’ is a hit cult in both its original book form and long-running stage performance. It's been described as raucous, raunchy and ridiculous.

“The show is for a really diverse audience. It's a little bit raunchy yet my mum, who is as conservative as they come, thoroughly enjoyed it. Everyone should come and watch it” Shaun enthuses.

‘He Died With A Felafel In His Hand’ will be appearing at The Brisbane Powerhouse from October 1-5.

Published in Theatre
Wednesday, 02 October 2013 16:25

48 Hour Film Project: Film In Preview

‘The 48 Hour Film Project’ is a wild and crazy filmmaking competition where teams must write, shoot, edit and deliver a short film in only 48 hours.

Now in its 9th year locally, Brisbane filmmakers will join more than 60,000 people from 120 countries to see who can make the best short film in a weekend. The organiser of the Brisbane leg of the competition Matt Grehan shares more.

Describe this event in 5 words? (plus one number!?)
Brisbane films made in 48 hours.

What is your role?
I am the City Producer so I organise the whole event from recruiting filmmaking teams to gathering sponsors, plus organising the judging process, prizes and creating screening tapes. Basically I put on the event to encourage emerging filmmakers in Brisbane to have an avenue to create films and have them screened to the public.

Why do you love films?
I’ve always loved films because they show new and interesting worlds that can take you away from whatever you’re doing at the moment. They’re basically just big stories that have this amazing ability to entertain and I love being able hear, see and feel all the different stories that everyone has to tell.

What are the entries like this year?
The entries this year are amazing. Every year you think, 'How did these guys manage top pull off these films in only 48 hours!?' We had 38 teams enter — the most Brisbane has even seen — and the quality from them all is just phenomenal. We’re really proud of the emerging Brisbane filmmakers’ scene.

Best short film you've even seen?
I really loved a short film from Disney that came out last year called ‘Paperman’ which is this little love story between a man and a woman. It’s a cute story and looks amazing plus it’s animated. Another favourite is called ‘Glenn Owen Dodds’, which was shot in Brisbane a few years back about a man who meets God aka Glenn Owen Dodds who teaches him a few life lessons.

What makes a great short film?
I think to make a great short film it should be a short, simple idea that transcends any language barriers. I think the best shorts are silent and tell a quirky story with a really clever twist that makes you smile. I’m sure others would have different ideas, but that’s what I like.

What would the world be like without short films?
Well, short films are what basically all major filmmakers cut their teeth on. So if we didn’t have short films, we possibly wouldn’t have feature films and movies at the cinemas. Filmmakers first started making shorts, before moving onto longer ones. So if we suddenly stop making shorts now, the new generation of feature filmmakers might not exist and we won’t get any movies in the future. We don’t want that to happen so we need to continue to support short filmmaking!

‘The 48 Hour Film Project’ is at the Judith Wright Centre Oct 4-5.

Published in Film
Wednesday, 02 October 2013 16:19

Strange Attractor: Theatre In Preview

A storm is brewing at the Brisbane Arts Theatre, as the ferocity of human relationships collide with the ferocity of mother nature, in new Australian play ‘Strange Attractor’.

“It's a play about six people and a railroad construction site in the Pilgara in Western Australia. The exciting incident is that a cyclone comes through and there's a death. You learn a person dies at the beginning of the play, but you don't find out how until the end, so it's a pseudo murder-mystery,” explains Brazilian born actor Pedro Ramos, who plays Chilli, a foreign labourer trying to make a better life for his family in Australia.

“Chilli is a fish out of water for various reasons, and I had to figure out what his purpose was, by getting into the mindset of someone wanting all the things they couldn't have back home. It wasn't hard for me, being a foreigner myself.”

Best known for her television writing credits including ‘Bastard Boys’ and ‘Brides of Christ’, playwright Sue Smith has created an intense story about the balancing act between temptation and your moral compass. It is a drama that explores the relationships and secrets that exist in Australia's isolated workplaces.

“It's about how the six characters react to the death or are reacting to what happens before it. It explores some timelines — which is fascinating — as well as the different facets of working in an environment like that,” says Pedro.

Once the cyclone has wreaked havoc, the small team of employees wait anxiously for 'the company man' to arrive from Perth and carry out investigations. The crew do their best to distract themselves, coming together in a makeshift mess hall, in which the evening takes an unexpected turn.

“Everyone in the team has done a really good job at making this play. It really just sucks you in and makes you feel completely enthralled by what's going on.”

To capture the inhospitality of the Outback, the play utilises high level production values to captivate and terrify.

“There's a lot of warm lighting to convey the sense of heat. The backgrounds give you a sense that there's more beyond the walls and for the cyclone we use sounds and strobe lights that really bring it alive and make it pop! The moment the storm hits is terrifying — the audience will feel like they are in the cyclone themselves.”

The role of Chilli is yet another blessing for Pedro, who only became active in theatre at the start of this year, but is already making a tradition of playing complex Latino characters.

“I did theatre in high school and loved it. I did a couple of main stage productions back then but moved around a bit so never got a chance to get back into theatre. It wasn't until stabilising myself in Brisbane that I decided I was going to give it another chance and that was late last year. I've been lucky because for some reason there's been a few plays needing someone from a Latin background and it's just been serendipitous for me and them. My accent has been a blessing and a curse, but I think more a blessing because it gives me a chance to take on roles that no one else can.”

Smith's script was shortlisted for a NSW Premier's Awards 2011 and promises a theatre experience that is witty, well-crafted and beautifully brought to life.

‘Strange Attractor’ is staged at The Brisbane Arts Theatre from October 4-26.

Published in Theatre
Wednesday, 02 October 2013 16:16

Katchafire: Simply The Best So Far

New Zealand roots reggae band Katchafire are heading back to Australian soil to tour their compilation album, ‘Best So Far’.

“It's about making people aware that we've been together for ten years, we've put out four albums and we managed to pick out 21 tracks that we thought was some of our best work,” guitarist Logan Bell explains. “Our live show over the last ten years has kind of evolved into this 'best of' mash up and all the songs that the crowds react to the most. That tends to change from country to country, so we've kind of tailor made it for our Aussie crowd.”

The band are in the middle of their world tour and will be playing shows in Australia throughout October.

“We're stoked to get back there and connect with our Australian fans and all the Kiwis over there and all the new fans we're going to make. Straight after Australia we've got Brazil. Then we've got the summer festival circuit at home and next year we're taking off and doing the world tour thing again. Europe, UK, USA, South America. We're adding Japan, Indonesia and a few more to the list.”

Katchafire recently played Glastonbury, but Bell says they're looking forward to getting back to playing basic headline shows.

“I like the intimacy of a smaller show. But that's what we try and create with our headline shows. You know, we try and create big numbers with a nice intimate vibe with your crowd. That's what I think a lot of the artists try and do when they're playing stadiums and on that level. We see more and more of that, trying to connect with your fans. I think that's what I love about the intimacy, more of a connection.”

An almost non-stop tour schedule over the last ten years has taken a toll on the band and their families, but Bell says their tight bond keeps them motivated.

“We've done a lot of big things and I think our biggest achievement is being able to stay together. Full credit to the boys for keeping it tight and definitely being a strong unit. We've all got kids and partners that are a huge help, they're the backbone really. All our kids are used to us going away for long lengths and they just know that their dads have a job to do.”

Katchafire planned to release an EP before their next album, but scrapped the idea to focus entirely on a new record. As the band wrap up their 'Best So Far' world tour, they prepare to begin work on that LP.

“We're not actually doing the EP thing anymore,” Bell confirms; “it's more of an album. We're just going to keep going on the album. We're always learning and evolving in the studio. Being blessed with some of the big names that we've worked with is always a great learning opportunity. You always take that with you on a journey and try to use it to make your next work better. We are putting a deadline [for the album] on April or May next year.”

Katchafire play Byron Bay Brewery October 3, Caloundra Music Festival October 4, The Hi-Fi October 13 and Parkwood Tavern October 20.

Published in Reggae/ Roots
Wednesday, 02 October 2013 16:04

The Matchstick: Top Five Kebab Extras

Scene’s intrepid editor, Gareth Bryant aka The Matchstick will make his festival DJing debut when he plays Island Vibe next month.
[Ed’s note: doesn’t matter that it’s 11am Sunday!!]

To prepare for the occasion, Matchstick shares his once not-so secret recipe for the perfect kebab.

1. Cheese. Don’t go skimping on the dairy now, even if it does give you an upset tum-tum. The cheese is the glue that holds any kebab together. They teach you that in kebab extras 101.

2. Pineapple. Yeah, yeah... you never put pineapple with anything that’s hot. Stuff that. I have it with pasta, pizza and kebabs. It’s the sweetness that makes it a must-have.

3. I’ll have mine minus the lettuce and tomato. Who needs all that extra water, dude? It’s just tasteless filler, man. Ramp up the onion levels if you really need the vegetable quota higher.

4. Satay sauce. Yep, I add an extra sauce element to my meat finger delight. Sour cream and bbq are the requisite first two choices — always. The satay adds that extra ‘pop’ your mouth will water itself over.

5. Black olives. The salty taste highlights the rest of the kebab in a way that even the most enlightened sherpa can’t explain. I know I can’t.

The Matchstick joins a horde of acts and DJs performing at Island Vibe Festival, North Stradbroke Island, October 25-27. islandvibe.com.au

Published in Electronic
Wednesday, 02 October 2013 15:56

Tornado Wallace: Talcum Powder Disco

Australian Tornado Wallace  is shaking things up on the global scene, proving house (music) is where the heart is.

Explain your sound for the unfamiliar/ uninitiated.
Talcum powder disco. Equatorial house. Cough syrup techno.

You’re touring all over the world these days; where’s home though? Still Melbourne?
You bet.

How was the northern summer? How do you see punters’ tastes changing?
I spent most of the northern summer in the southern winter, but I've caught the tail end of it in the US. People seem to be enjoying the cooler weather but still making the most of some warmth while it's there. I haven't witnessed any mass genre migration. I tend to play small but cool parties where people's tastes don't float around with whatever happens to be current or relevant.

How do you think the Australia scene measures up to Europe and the US? Are we credible?
Yeah we're totally credible. Most dance music scenes anywhere in the world seem to be largely based around drug and alcohol consumption — Australia included. But there's always a minority section where the music itself is the focus, or at least a priority. In Melbourne and in other parts of Australia this minority seems to be a bit stronger than in a lot of other cities that are misguidedly considered more culturally important. It would be nicer to have more of the satellite cities stepping up and joining in the good times, which happens a lot surrounding other large cities in the world, but with Australia's smaller population it is understandably rare. Props to cities like Wollongong, Byron Bay and Geelong for getting involved though!

Where are you witnessing a ‘changing of the guard’ with regards to music fans rejecting EDM and instead embracing more quality electronic sounds?
I try to not think about all that. It's sad that clubs, festivals, promoters and people feel the need to pay so much money for such abrasive and mindless music. You can't really blame the DJs at the centre of it though. Who's going to say no to a six-figure pay cheque for an hour’s work? The whole thing is a bit depressing, but it's always been there one way or another.

What’s next for release?
I'll have an EP coming out early next year on ESP Institute. Other than that there'll be a remix I did for The Pharaohs which should be released in the coming weeks.

Will you be releasing an album in the future?
It's not something I'm thinking too seriously about right now. Being into dance music for so long I seem to have listened to most music as singles as opposed to full albums. So that's the format that makes the most sense to me for now. Things change though.

What can fans expect from you at Rainbow Serpent and how do you approach an event like this as opposed to some of your recent shows in the US and Europe?
Festival sets are generally a little bit more planned as the run time is shorter so you can't take the music to places where you might in a three hour plus set, but you still want to make sure you get all the special jams in there. So a bit more preparation is needed I think, rather than rocking up to a club with as much music as you can carry and seeing where the night takes you (which is two USB sticks for most DJs, but that's another story).

What’s the goal for 2014?
Chill even harder. Care even less.

Tornado Wallace performs at Rainbow Serpent in rural Victoria (Lexton) Jan 24-27.

Published in Electronic

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